Camden Hills Regional High School

Home of the Windjammers

World History I/II
Mr. Wallace
Room 325 - Period
 
Syllabus
Description:

Camden Hills Regional High School

World History

 

Course Description: This course provides an introduction to World History from the postclassical period to the present. The first semester focuses largely on the impacts of the movement of goods, people, and ideas during the postclassical and early modern periods. Specific attention is devoted to the rise and spread of Islam, the impacts of Mongol expansion, the emergence and impacts of humanism in early modern Europe, and the collision of European and Native American cultures through the Columbian Exchange. The second semester focuses on the period 1800 to the present, and explores the impact of contact between western and non-western peoples as a result of European imperialism. Specific attention is devoted to modern Africa, India, and China as well as the two World Wars. A variety of student-centered activities featuring critical thinking, writing, researching, interviewing, and presentation skills are incorporated into the class.

 

General Guiding Questions Addressed Across Multiple Units—

What is research?

What makes a source valid and reliable?

What is a thesis?

How is a logical argument structured?

How can research inform decision-making?

 
Expectations:

Unit 1: The Rise and Spread of Islam (500 C.E. – 1000 C.E.)

Objectives: In this unit, students will…

A] Depict the major geographical features of the Middle East during

the period 500-1000 C.E.

B] Explain the core beliefs and practices of Islam, including its connections to

            Judaism and Christianity, and the origins of important divisions of Islam

            (ex: Shia-Sunni).

C] Depict and describe the rise and spread of Islam from the 7th through the 15th

            centuries C.E.

D] Explain the cultural achievements of the Islamic world, including the adoption

            and preservation of classical Greek and Roman cultures.

E] Analyze the impacts of the spread of Islam upon at least 2 different societies and

            areas, such as central Asia, India, northern Africa, sub-Saharan Africa,

            Eastern Europe, and the Iberian peninsula.

 

Guiding Questions for this unit:

How can the movement of people, goods and ideas affect societies?

·      What is Islam?

·      How did Islam spread to different areas over time?

·      How did Islam affect different regions as it spread?

 

Unit 2: Mongol Empires Across Asia (500-1500 C.E.)

Objectives: In this unit, students will…

A] Describe the major geographical features of Asia during the period 500-1000 C.E. 

B] Describe and explain distinctive cultural achievements of Chinese society

            during the Song and Tang period.

C]  Describe unique cultural, economic, and political features of Mongol society.

D] Evaluate the impacts of the spread of Mongol society upon at least two Eurasian

            peoples, such as China, India, the Middle East, or Eastern Europe, during

the period 500-1000 C.E.  

 

Guiding Questions for this unit:

How can the movement of people, goods and ideas affect societies?

·      Who were the Mongols?

·      How did the Mongols spread their influence?

·      How did the expansion of Mongol rule affect different societies?

 

Unit 3: Humanism in Early Modern Europe (1400-1800 C.E.)

Objectives: In this unit, students will…

 

A] Explain specific differences between a medieval and a modern worldview.

B] Identify and explain key elements of humanism, such as secularism, individualism, rationalism, classicism, etc.

C] Connect the major ideas of the Renaissance, Scientific Revolution, and Enlightenment (e.g. Humanism, Empiricism, Rationalism, Deism) to the French Revolution .

D] Identify and explain the importance of selected individuals and events from the Renaissance, Protestant Reformation, Scientific Revolution, and French Revolution.

 

 

Guiding Questions for this unit…

How can the movement of ideas, goods, and people affect societies? How can ideas, beliefs and values affect societies?

  • What is “modern western thought”?
  • How did the Renaissance change the western worldview?
  • What is humanism?
  • How did the Protestant Reformation reflect humanism?
  • How did the ideas of humanism both change and continue from the Renaissance through the Scientific Revolution and the Enlightenment?
  • How did the ideas of the Enlightenment drive the French Revolution?

 

Unit 4: The Columbian Exchange

                        Objectives: In this unit, students will…

 

A] Connect the ideas of Humanism to European exploration and expansion in the early modern period.

B] Evaluate the short and long-term impacts of the Columbian exchange on Latin American societies.

 

Guiding Questions for this unit…

How can movement of people, goods and ideas change societies?

  • What is the “Columbian Exchange”?

 

Unit 5: Industrialism- Causes and Effects

                        Objectives: In this unit, students will…

A] Describe major aspects of an industrial society (e.g., demographic trends such as urban/rural mix or % of workforce in agriculture, manufacturing, services).

B] Analyze the factors that enabled Britain to industrialize in the eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries.

C] Evaluate the social, economic, political, and/or environmental impacts of the early industrial revolution.

 

Guiding Questions for this unit…

What is “industrialism”?

·      What are the factors that enable nations to industrialize (e.g., Britain)?

·      What are the costs and benefits of an industrial economy?

 

 

Unit 6: Economic Philosophies of the Industrial Revolution

                        Objectives: In this unit, students will…

 

A] Explain various economic philosophies that emerged from the industrial revolution (Capitalism, Socialism, Communism).

B] Evaluate potential strengths and weaknesses of various economic systems such as capitalism (free-market economy) and socialism (command economy).

 

Guiding Questions for this unit…

How do different economic systems address different societal goals and needs?

·      What is capitalism?

·      What is socialism?

·      What is communism?

 

Unit 7: Imperialism

                        Objectives: In this unit, students will…

A] Analyze the reasons for modern European imperialism, and its connection to industrialism.

B] Evaluate the short and long-term impacts of European imperialism on a particular region such as south Asia (India/Pakistan), Africa, and Europe itself.

C] Identify important individuals, terms, major turning points, and geographical features that relate to modern European imperialism (e.g. Gandhi, Apartheid, Berlin Conference).

 

Guiding Questions for this unit…

What is “imperialism”?

·      What are the economic, cultural, and political reasons for imperialism?

·      What are the short and long-term impacts of imperialism on various regions and peoples (e.g., Africa, India)?

 

Unit 8: China and the West

            Objectives: In this unit, students will…

A] Explain the reasons for China’s decline in the world order in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries.

B] Explain the causes of the Chinese Communist Revolution.

C] Evaluate the costs and benefits of the rule of the Chinese Communist Party from 1949 through the death of Mao.

D] Discuss issues of national identity in contemporary Chinese society (since the 1980s).

E] Identify important individuals, terms, geographic features and major turning points in Chinese history from the late 18th century to the present.

 

Guiding Questions for this unit…

What is “modern China”?

·      How and why did China’s place in the world order change during the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries?

·      How and why did China turn to communism?

·      How has communism affected China during and after the Mao years?

·      How does contemporary Chinese society blend traditional Chinese and modern western influences?

 

Unit 9: The World Wars

            Objectives: In this unit, students will…

A] Explain major causes of World War I, including industrialism, imperialism, nationalism, and militarism.

B] Identify and explain major outcomes of WWI (Versailles treaty).

C] Discuss the impact of industrial technologies on modern warfare (both wars).

D] Analyze the unresolved issues of WWI that led to WWII (connect to causes of WWI).

E] Explain the major components of fascism, with specific reference to Japan and Germany (including Holocaust).

F] Assess the ways in which World War II changed the world order (decline of European imperialism, rise of US and USSR, role of UN).

G] Identify important individuals, terms, and turning points that relate to the World Wars.

 

Guiding Questions for this unit…

How have global conflicts changed the world order in the 20th century?

·      How did industrialism, imperialism, nationalism, and militarism lead to the outbreak of WWI and WWII?

·      How did industrial technology change warfare in the 20th century?

·      What is fascism?

·      How did the Treaty of Versailles lead to the growth of totalitarian regimes?

·      How did the Cold War emerge from WWII?

 
Grading Policy:
 
Assignments:
iCal Subscriptions
World History (red day)

webcal://seneca.fivetowns.net/calendars/World%20History%20(red).ics